Rachel Shackleton's blog

SUFFERING FROM GASTRIC BLOATING, DIFFICULTY DIGESTING FOOD, POOR SLEEP OR SKIN DISORDERS? CHAMOMILE A MOST VERSATILE HERB

German Chamomile (Chamomila recucita) - we all know this flower as Chamomile tea, drunk before going to bed to relax body and mind from infusing the flowers in boiled water.  Known to calm the spirit.  This herb flowers profusely at this time of year creating a yellow and white carpet.  Not only good for calming and relaxing, Chamomile is very effective in addressing gut issues and skin disorders.

Alert - All Hay Fever Sufferers!

Earlier this week, I received a call from a lady who was frantically trying to find a cure for her son’s hay fever (allergic rhinitis). His main symptoms were streaming eyes, sneezing, mucous, thick head and the inability to sleep well. Nothing from the chemist was touching it.  This call spurred me to share some ideas for treating hay fever naturally.

FRIEND OR FOE – THE HUMBLE STINGING NETTLE

Most of us can relate to the Nettle as mostly an unpleasant experience when inadvertently coming in contact and receiving a tingling, itching sensation to the skin for hours to come. The more nettles that manage to sting you the longer it lasts and the more intensive the tingling.  The humble and prolific nettle is also very nutritious containing vitamins A, B, C, E, and K, as well as being packed with minerals including iron, potassium, magnesium, phosphorous and selenium.  The high iron content makes it useful for treatment of anemia when mixed with molasses.

STRESSED? SO WHAT?

The dictionary defines stress as “a pressure or tension exerted on another object; a demand on physical or mental energy; or forcibly exerted influence usually causing distress or strain.”    In short stress is any factor, positive or negative that requires a response or change. Medical research recognises that chronic ongoing stress can lead to illness, aggravate existing disease conditions and accelerate aging.

Kimchi - The Healthy Soul of Korean Food

Whilst spending time in South Korea it is obvious that I should blog about the famous Korean Kimchi.  Kimchi is a traditional food made by fermenting vegetables with probiotic lactic acid bacteria and served as a side dish with most Korean meals, along with chilli paste, seaweed, and rice.

The main ingredient is Chinese cabbage, often with other vegetables, such as leek, scallions, cucumber and radish, all of which are fermented together in herbs and spices, usually garlic, cayenne pepper and ginger.